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Caravel Labs going to Brunei

Caravel Labs going to Brunei

  Congratulations to Grominda Sdn. Bhd. for being selected to execute the Tech Immersion Programme 2022 sponsored by the Authority for Info-Communications Technology Industry (AITI) of Brunei Darussalam.   Caravel Labs is proud to support Grominda in delivering training and coaching based on the same approach that is used in their academic internship program, Project Sunrise, and for onboarding its own consulting engineers. We are looking forward to being in Brunei during the week of January 30, 2023 thru February 3, 2023 to support this program.  

Recruiting Top Consulting Engineers

Recruiting Top Consulting Engineers

In a speech to the first cohort of Project Sunrise interns back in the summer of 2020, Yang Zheng, laid out his vision for the mid- to senior-level Consulting Engineer at Caravel Labs. A good software engineer is one who can design and implement the most elegant software solution that works as defined, in the most efficient manner. A good consultant on the other hand is one who is willing and able to embrace the customer’s entire environment – their needs, their wants, their desires, their real and perceived constraints, and reflect these in the definition of the solution. A good consulting engineer is one who is able to combine both of these.

Open-source Software at Caravel Labs

Open-source Software at Caravel Labs

By Subham Kundu and Marcos Ocasio Open-source software (OSS) is very important to Caravel Labs. We rely on open-source software for many of the solutions supporting our internal operations but also integrate many community-developed open-source components in solutions we build for our consulting customers. Therefore, it makes sense for Caravel Labs to contribute back to the open-source software community. In this post we will cover our approach to contributing to open-source and introduce some of our latest open-source initiatives.

Welcome Our Latest Team Members

Welcome Our Latest Team Members

Back in July we concluded our latest edition of Project Sunrise (read more about it here). The purpose of Project Sunrise is to identify not only the brightest among the community of budding software engineers, but also those who are most inspired to use their future profession for creating a more sustainable world. The next step is to give them a taste of what the satisfaction of applying their skills thoughtfully towards solving a meaningful problem. We do this in the hope that the entire community of software engineers, of which Caravel Labs is only a small part, benefits from engineers driven by intrinsic motivations rather than just the usual material incentives. We believe that through their experience in Project Sunrise they become part of the small but ever-growing pool of elite software engineers that are the pride of any software engineering organization in the world. 

Thoughts On Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Thoughts On Indigenous Peoples’ Day

By Ashu Chatterji, CEO at Caravel Labs Caravel Labs team members in the United States and Puerto Rico observe the Indigenous Peoples’ Day holiday on the second Monday of October. This holiday celebrates and honors the histories and cultures of the peoples who have lived in the Americas, since before the arrival of the first conquistadors, starting with Christopher Columbus in 1492. Since 2021, this holiday has also been recognized as a federal holiday by presidential proclamation. 

In Support of Girls Who Code

In Support of Girls Who Code

By Ashu Chatterji, CEO at Caravel Labs The underrepresentation of women in both the creative and executive jobs in the tech industry is a handicap greater than what meets the eye. Like all kinds of underrepresentation, not only is it unfair to women who represent much closer to 50% of the human population, it denies the other tech community of the wisdom and perspective of close to half of humanity, thereby severely diminishing its impact and reducing its potential.

Demystifying Product Management

Demystifying Product Management

By Ashu Chatterji, CEO at Caravel Labs Less than 40% of software projects using modern software engineering practices meet their intended business goals, provide the expected value and satisfy the needs of their users. This is according to the latest report from Standish Group, which has been researching the success rates of software projects for over 25 years. That proportion used to be even less when waterfall approaches were dominant – just over 10% projects were successful back then, but thanks to the widespread adoption of iterative and incremental development (often termed as “Agile development”) and increasing emphasis on removal of developer toil using automation (often termed as “DevOps”), significant improvements have been made. However, a less than 50-50 chance of project success is outrageous, especially in an age where innovators and changemakers depend so heavily on software engineering to scale their impact towards a sustainable future for our planet. It is therefore no surprise that the business of planning, developing, launching, and managing a product or service has become particularly critical to the success of software engineering efforts, and software product management has emerged as a key performance differentiator in the world of software development. When McKinsey published their report on the correlation between business agility and developer velocity in 2021, one of the core differentiators was an organization’s product management capabilities (the others being tools, culture and talent management). Incidentally, a conspicuous absence in defiance of prevailing wisdom was the absence of “Agile team practices”.

How much time do you need in-person with the customer?

How much time do you need in-person with the customer?

By Ashu Chatterji, CEO at Caravel Labs This is a question that we often encounter in different situations in our consulting practice. Our answer that we would like to spend as little time meeting customers in-person, or meeting in general, is often met with surprise. In the consulting industry, where much value has been put traditionally in the ability to travel to attend large events, meet with powerful and influential stakeholders and demonstrate one’s credential as a “thought leader”, we can understand why our position would be considered unconventional.